Monday, September 19, 2016

Troubleshooting A ReactJS Project With BugReplay



React is frequently written in JSX and then compiled down to JavaScript using something like Babel. Afterwards, the JavaScript is pretty much unrecognizable. This makes for tricky debugging when your console errors point to a line in the compiled js.
When compiling with Babel, you can specify that Babel additionally create source map files (.map), which is an index that allows a parser (like Chrome DevTools) to translate a compiled, combined and/or minified file back to its original state. That way line numbers in console stack traces match up to the actual source of the error in your own code, versus in the compiled JavaScript where the line number is likely different.
For this example I’ve forked ToDoMVC, which is an example ToDo list app written in a handful of different frameworks. I’ve broken the ‘toggle all’ feature, which fires off when clicking the button which toggles all ToDo items either checked or unchecked. I modified the source so it runs off of compiled and minified JavaScript, since the original example translates to JavaScript on the fly via JSXTransformer.
The purposely broken ToDoMVC is available here.
Here is the BugReplay report that reproduces the issue. I click the ‘toggle all’ button and nothing happens. When viewing the report, you can see the problem along with the corresponding JavaScript error at ~5 seconds into the video.
Clicking on the JavaScript error ‘Uncaught ReferenceError: evnt is not defined’ gives you the corresponding stacktrace.
The first item in the stack trace is:



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The source is listed as ../js/app.jsx, which is the file that our compiled and minified js was built from. You can see this file in the ‘Resources’ tab of DevTools, which is generated by Chrome from the minified js coupled with its corresponding map file.
BugReplay checks the server to see if map files exist when saving console logs, and if so, will use them to generate the correct file-name and line numbers based on the code in the original file.
If I open my local copy of js/app.jsx, the line it is complaining about is:



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As you can see, the error is occurring on line 58 of the jsx file, where there’s a fairly obvious but very common problem: I’ve referred to the ‘event’ variable as ‘evnt.’
Here is the same issue, but without source map files on the server.
The error itself is still clear, but the stack trace line number is useless due to the JSX compilation and minification.
MostJavaScript frameworks that minify or combine sources include an option for generating source maps, so whether you’re using browser DevTools or BugReplay, they are a huge help for debugging.

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